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A signaling quiz
#1
You sit East, with

TSKSQSAHAHTHTHQHQHJHTCKCJCADADTDTDTDKDKD

South becomes declarer in clubs. South starts with some aces:

Trick 1: AH,JH,KH,JH
Trick 2: AS,JS,KS,QS
Trick 3: AS,JS,TS,TS
Trick 4: QS,AS,JS,KS

West is in now...
Trick 5: AH,QH,AH,JH
Trick 6: AD,JD,KD,JD
Trick 7: AD,QD,KD,JD

1. Do you agree with East's plays? With which tricks, if any, would you take issue?

2. As West, what would you lead?
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#2
Please give respect to the original post by using spoiler tags. Here is a hyperlink to how to use spoiler tags.

Please post your own thoughts before you reveal my post (Click to View)
It's unbelievable how much you don't know about the game you've been playing all your life. -- Mickey Mantle
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#3
The scenario isn't constructed. This was an actual hand from a game yesterday.

Also, without giving away anything from mick's response...he made a comment on question 2, what should West exit, that I didn't show West's hand. That was intentional.
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#4
Third question.

The play through the first 6 tricks is the same, but trick 7 is now

AD,QD,AD,JD

Now, as West, with what suit would you exit?
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#5
mickmackusa's response to "Considering the two Ace-Leadbacks and the King-Leadback, what suit would you, as West, exit with? (Click to View)
It's unbelievable how much you don't know about the game you've been playing all your life. -- Mickey Mantle
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#6
First off, MY question.

1 For tricks two, three, and four, East played :qs:, :ts:, :ks:.
Was THAT a signal, showing partner three Spades?
2 I've never heard of King signals. Will somebody explain them.
3 I need a good explanation of Jack signals. I thought one used Ace and Jack signals together.

My answers
If you are going to talk about inferences, South has plenty of Clubs as trump and wants Spades led. So (s)he must be short in the red suits. With nothing better to do, Eas-West should be playing red cards and force South's trump.

First off, MY question.

1 For tricks two, three, and four, East played :qs:, :ts:, :ks:.
Was THAT a signal, showing partner three Spades?
2 I've never heard of King signals. Will somebody explain them.
3 I need a good explanation of Jack signals. I thought one used Ace and Jack signals together.

My answers
If you are going to talk about inferences, South has plenty of Clubs as trump and wants Spades led. So (s)he must be short in the red suits. With nothing better to do, Eas-West should be playing red cards and force South's trump.
Rick Hall
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#7
To the question...QS,TS,KS.

Well, let's go through the situation. South plays AS. East doesn't want to give a point, so the QS is forced. South plays the second AS. East can now see a route: give West a trump ace and one of the 2 missing spade aces, and there's a route to him. Note, too, that North did NOT signal in spades; moreso, he played TS. If North had both spade aces AND a ten, he can signal with AS, as the TS covers the 4th round of the suit. Therefore, it's likely West has one or both missing spade aces. That means the parlay East hopes for, isn't that unlikely, especially given than his trump holding is really pathetic. East wants to clue West in. The 'normal' play, since East HAS to play a point, would be to play KS...playing up the line. Therefore, he starts a multiple-card signal by playing the TS.

Did it show 3? Not entirely. There's 1 other case. Give East exactly ASTSKSQS, and he should play the same. Put yourself in East's shoes, with differing spade lengths including TS and KS, and with the goal of telling West something about spades. How would you play those cards to do this?
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#8
The Spade Play:

Perfectly clear. With either of the two holdings, South is showing fourth round control of the Spade suit. Either has :as: or he has only 3 Spades and will trump the fourth Spade.

That was what I thought the sequence was supposed to show. Not a convention per se, but sequence of played cards that is "unusual". Poor players might do it because "it doesn't matter". Good players would always do it, with a partner that notices such plays, because "it does matter".
Rick Hall
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#9
Right. The only 'conventional' aspect is in deciding what is 'usual' and what is 'unusual.'

But I'll take it further than showing 4th round control...I'll generally do this only with the initial 4-card holding. I may do it if I really, really need to get in...maybe I've got 1 or 2 crashable aces, or where my aces have a high risk of getting ruffed, as here *before* West cashes the other red aces. Switch, say, one of the diamond aces in the original East hand, to a spade ace. If North gets in before me, I probably lose 2 red aces.

Here's my comments now on how this hand went:
East's plays
So on the second question
Part of the thrust of this quiz is actually to recognize when NOT to make certain signals.
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#10
1.  I agree  with East's  plays on West's EXCEPT on Trick 7 I would give an additional  Ace leadback in diamonds instead of the non leadback King of diamonds.

2.  Not seeing what West has, I would recommend that Trick 8 be either a King of hearts OR diamonds so a three point trick will result for the W/E team.
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