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Not Much to Analyze But...
#1
I just finished a game in which my partner and I took every trick in one hand.  I don't believe I've ever seen that happen before in Double Deck.  Here's the hand history:
Code:
% Format "PPN 1.0"
% Site "worldofcardgames.com"
% Date "2016.05.07"
% ID "14626748682356"
% Players "N-Ti E-R2 S-Qu W-Ch"
% tableid "49d48bb9-7e83-4fdd-b28b-870af99a7231"

[GameScores "321:201"]
[Deal "W:CAKKDAATKQQJSAKQHAATQQQJ CATTTQQQJJJDKJSATJHATKKJ CJDAATTKKQQSAATTTQJJJHTQ CAATKKQDTJJSKKKQQHATKKJJ"]
[Auction "N:60 Pass Pass Pass"]
[Contract "N 60 D"]
[Melds "31:CADATKQJSAKQHA 4:CJDJSJHJ 8:CDKKQQSH 36:CKQDJJSKKQQH"]
[Play "N"]
AS JS TS QS N2
AC JC JC QC N1
AH JH TH JH N2
AH KH QH JH N2
QH AH QD KH S2
AS QS KS TS S3
AS KS QS AS S3
QS KS KD JD N2
TH KH KD KH S4
TS KS TD KD N4
QH TH QD TH S2
TS TD AD JC N3
QH JC TD AH S2
JS JD QD QC N0
JH QC TD JD S1
JS KC JD QC N1
KC AC AD KC S4
JS TC QD TC N2
KC TC AD AC S4
KD AC AD TC N6
[MeldScores "39:40"]
[PlayScores "50:0"]
[Result "SAVED"]
[HandScores "89:0"]

By the way, when I played single-deck with my family, we called this a "schnitzel." I'm not sure if that was just my parents' name for this or if it was more widely used. Anyone else use this term for taking all the tricks?
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#2
Definitely old school, right from Germany or something Smile I haven'tr heard that before.

I've taken all the tricks at least once, maybe twice, and probably was on receiving end once or twice through the years, but more memorably had to pull 48 to save one time back in college days and did it right on the nose. That's quite a feeling. With the nature of classes (for those that went) partners changed frequently between games but pool of players were well known and quality of play overall was excellent. I don't have any idea who my partners were when we pulled all 50 (or saved with 48). Those were the days though.
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#3
I've heard "Boston" used elsewhere, but I don't use it nor know anyone who uses the term.
It's unbelievable how much you don't know about the game you've been playing all your life. -- Mickey Mantle
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#4
Very nice, congrats!
Play Pinochle at World of Card Games!
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#5
BTW I'd heard the term "Boston" used in Spades but maybe it's also used in Pinochle...
Play Pinochle at World of Card Games!
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#6
Congrats!! That is an amazing feeling!!
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#7
I've heard 'boston' for this.

While all results are almost all luck, this one's particularly unusual.  SOUTH's hand is the one that has the obvious potential for it...the incredibly massive 2 suiter.  North got lucky as heck;  South probably was screaming at the Fates.  "AGH!!!! WHY ME?"  7 loser hand, but VERY hard to bid.  Then North opens 60.  Waaahhhhh....by South.

Then North names one of South's massive suits.

Oh my.

My, oh my.

South can clearly see that only 3 cards not shown in the meld are needed for the boston...the 4th aces of spades and diamonds, and the second heart ace.  That's it.  Oh, and a BIT of luck...the 2nd round of spades would have to live.  That should be likely;  North opened 60, so he can't have any LESS of a trump suit.  Given that N/S have 15 trump, there's only 5 left for E/W.  2+ spades for each becomes more likely, despite South's spade length.  And there are other chances...spade ace crashes in either opp's hand, or EAST has  AD XD XD  and it gets crashed.  (South can force that to happen.)

I'll make one observation.  At tricks 6 and 7, South cashes 2 spade aces.  On those cards, the missing 10 and ace BOTH crash.  South's 5 remaining spades are ALL winners.  After 3 rounds with no ruffs, there's only 3 missing spades.  South has all 3 10s, so the queens are also good.  What South wants to do is to SCREAM at North, "let's get TRUMPS OUT, NOW!"  At trick 8, South should play   AD   AD  and probably   TD  to ensure the boston if North has the 4th ace, OR if EAST started with  AD XD  or  AD XD XD .  (OK...the boston MAY NOT happen if *North* has 8 trump, and *South* has to start the ruffs.  This would lead to North being on lead with a loser at trick 20.  Or if North has 9 trump...then it can't happen.)  South's play after the diamond aces will be influenced by North's cards.

The actual play of the  QS  was very badly wrong;  it *could* have let East score an overruff.  South knows, as a practical certainty:  East is out of spades.  East *may* have a TD  or even  AD  and North doesn't know about the trump fit.  And there's no point;  that card is a trick *later*.  South can ensure the boston, as noted above, IF *he* has the absolutely last trump(s) and is on lead to run spades.  It worked out, yes, but there was some chance...maybe 10%, I'm thinking...that South's play at trick 8 would give East a trick.  South might play  AD  AD then  TS to suggest to North to ruff HIGH, not low;  that's probably OK, and rectifies the timing if North has 8 diamonds...this is the 2nd most likely scenario, at this point, for the boston to break down.
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#8
Final quick point...I forgot that South ruffed at trick 5, so is down to 7 trump. If North started with 8, then the boston is possible, but trickier. South needs some cooperation from North...North has to shorten HIS trump length, and get rid of his high trump that could block the suit. The boston is assured after trick 7 when there are no trump losers, AND when South is on lead, or can get the lead, after North is out of trump.

The lesson: this is one of the quite uncommon hands where the dummy can ignore any plan that declarer might have, and drive the play on his own. It's due to the combination of factors...his trump length, his trump *strength* (that 2nd trump 10 is huge), and his running side suit.
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